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Past Events of the Peace & Global Studies Program
 

Derrick Brooms: Race Relations, Identity, Representation and Culture

 2012 Peace and Global Studies Annual Symposium
What’s Cooking? New Research and Exploration in Food Studies


2 – 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 20
Science 100

Food Studies is an increasingly popular discipline because of its interdisciplinary nature and its relevance to society, the environment, culture and, most recently, media. This exciting symposium brings together cutting edge scholars who are exploring food from multiple contemporary perspectives.

2 p.m.
Welcome
Farha Ternikar, associate professor, sociology, Le Moyne College
Michael Streissguth, interim dean, arts and sciences, Le Moyne College

2:30 – 3:45 p.m.
Panel 1: Food and Society

Panelists:
Krishnendu Ray, chair, department of nutrition, food studies and public health
New York University
“An Indian Ocean Cuisine”

Alice Julier, professor, sociology
Chattham University
“Food in the Neighborhood: Difference, Development and Culinary Memory”

Frances Pestello, professor, sociology
Le Moyne College
“Eat, Pray, Love: an Exploration of Food and Faith”


4 – 5:15 p.m.
Panel 2: Food, Film and Culture

Panelists:
Patricia E. Clark, associate professor, English and creative writing
State University of New York at Oswego
“Post-Soul and the Future of Black Cuisine”

Laura Lindenfeld Sher, associate professor, department of communication and journalism and the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center
University of Maine
“Feasting Our Eyes: Food Films, Cultural Citizenship and American Identity”

Megan Elias, associate professor
Queensborough Community College of the City University of New York
“Gender, Class and Community in American Cookbooks”

The symposium is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies and the gender and women’s studies program. For more information, call (315) 445-4294.

2012
Justice for Chiapas

 Monday, Nov. 12, 2:30 – 4 p.m.
Curtin Special Events Room

Gubidcha Matus Lerma will speak on the human rights situation in Chiapas, Mexico, the Fray Bartolome Center's work, and the role of international solidarity. The Center has been widely recognized for accompanying indigenous communities under attack, documenting abuses, and defending cases in court. It has recently been increasingly threatened by paramilitary organizations for this work.

Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies and the departments of anthropology, criminology and sociology; foreign languages and literature; history; and political science.

 

Derrick Brooms: Race Relations, Identity, Representation and Culture

Monday, Oct. 15, 4 p.m.
Grewen Auditorium

Derrick Brooms is an assistant professor of sociology at Prairie State College and is a faculty affiliate for the African American Male Initiative Program, which is geared toward improving the academic achievement and retention of African American male students. He specializes in race relations, identity, representation and culture. Brooms' research investigates representations of African American identity and culture within the media. His two recent publications examine how slavery is represented in African American museums and how black-centered museums use Africa to legitimate African American identity. His research focuses on African American boys and men, specifically examining their educational experiences, identity development and representations in the American culture. Brooms holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago, a master’s degree from Clark Atlanta University and a doctorate in sociology from Loyola University Chicago.

His talk is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by peace and global studies. For more information, call 445-4294.

 

 

Global Food Studies Symposium

Food studies is increasingly popular because of its interdisciplinary nature and its relevance to society, the environment, culture and, most recently, media.  This exciting symposium brings together cutting-edge scholars who are exploring food from multiple contemporary perspectives.

The event was held Thursday, September 20 from 2:00 - 5:30 P.M. in Science 100

The event was sponsored by the Peace and Global Studies and the Gender and Women's Studies program.

Latin American Symposium Event Details   “Paying for America’s Addiction: Mexican Society in the War on Drugs”

“We live next to the world's largest drug consumer, and all the world wants to sell them drugs through our door and our window. And we live next to the world's largest arms seller, which is supplying the criminals." Mexican President Felipe Calderon, 2010


Roundtable Discussion: 2:30 – 4 p.m.: Reilley Room, Reilly Hall
“Caught in the Middle: The Mexican People in the War on Drugs”
Bruce A. Erickson: Moderator
Associate Professor of History, Le Moyne College
Paul Gootenberg: "Blowback to Mexico: The Drug War's March North, 1950-2010"
Professor of History, State University of New York at Stony Brook
Elaine Carey: "The Ice Women Cometh: Drug Trafficking 1920 to 1950"
Associate Professor of History, St. John’s University
Bruce A. Erickson: “Between the farm and the table: Mexico in the international drug trade”
Associate Professor of History, Le Moyne College

Keynote Lecture: 5 p.m., Panasci Family Chapel
Paul Gootenberg: “The Pre-Colombian Era of Drug Trafficking in the Americas: The Origins of Illicit Cocaine, 1945-1973”
Gootenberg is professor of history at SUNY Stony Brook and author of “Andean Cocaine: The Making of a Global Drug” (2009)

The symposium is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies, history department, gender and women’s studies program, Lectures Committee, Spanish Club, sociology department, History Academy and the department of foreign languages and literatures.  Thursday, March 15, 2012

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

2011

Film Screening: "Pray the Devil Back to Hell"

Saturday, Nov. 12, 6:30 p.m.
Grewen Auditorium

A documentary film from the PBS mini-series "Women, War and Peace" about the role of women in ending the Liberian civil war.

A documentary from the PBS mini-series, “Women, War and Peace,” about the role of women in ending the Liberian civil war.
Following the screening, there will be a discussion facilitated by Mardea Warner, Syracuse activist and daughter of the last democratically elected vice-president of Liberia before the civil war in that country, and Sanicee H. Kromah, Le Moyne College student and online political organizer in the Liberian diaspora.


Keynote Speaker: Laila Al-Arian, Al Jazeera English, “Televising the Revolutions: The Role of the Media in the Arab Spring”

Al-Arian holds a master’s degree from Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism. Her work has appeared in The Nation, Alternet, The Independent, The Guardian, The Australian, United Press International, and the Washington Report on Middle East Affairs. Al-Arian is the author, with Chris Hedges, of “Collateral Damage: America's War Against Iraqi Civilians.” The book is based on their 2007 Nation magazine investigative piece "The Other War," which was selected as one of Project Censored's 25 most important undercovered news stories of 2008.

The conference is sponsored by the CNY Peace Studies Consortium, Pan-African Community of Central New York, Center for Peace and Global Studies, Center for Urban & Regional Applied Research and the gender & women’s studies program.

A documentary from the PBS mini-series, “Women, War and Peace,” about the role of women in ending the Liberian civil war.
Following the screening, there will be a discussion facilitated by Mardea Warner, Syracuse activist and daughter of the last democratically elected vice-president of Liberia before the civil war in that country, and Sanicee H. Kromah, Le Moyne College student and online political organizer in the Liberian diaspora.

The conference and film are open to the public. The film is free, but you must register to attend the rest of the conference. Registration fee is $15 and includes lunch. The conference is free for Le Moyne students with ID and $10 for other students with ID. To register and for information on food and lodging in Syracuse, visit the CNY Peace Studies Consortium website at peaceconsortium.org.

 

Arlene Avakian: “Gender and the Armenian Genocide”
 

Thursday, Nov. 10, 4 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

Avakian’s grandmother, Elmas Tutuian, was a victim and survivor of the 1915-23 Turkish genocide of the Armenians. Avakian saw her storytelling as a narrative/performance through which her grandmother constructed herself as a survivor, healing herself through it from the trauma of genocide. Avakian analyzes the story from a psychological and textual perspective, addressing the interaction between the teller and the hearer. Free. Sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies.
 

Jen Marlowe: Reflections on Resistance: Palestine, Sudan and Troy Davis
 

Thursday, Oct. 27, 7 p.m.
Grewen Auditorium

Jen Marlowe is an award-winning filmmaker, author, playwright, and human rights advocate who has worked extensively in Palestine/Israel. Her play, “There is a Field,” depicts the lives of Palestinian citizens of Israel. “One Family in Gaza,” her most recent short documentary, chronicles the assault of 2009 through the story of one courageous family. Her most recent book, “The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian's Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker,” written with and about Sami Al Jundi, recounts Al Jundi's 10 years in an Israeli prison, followed by two decades of dedication to nonviolence and peaceful reconciliation.

Marlowe's talk will focus on the humanity behind the Palestine/Israel headlines. Weaving in film clips and passages from “The Hour of Sunlight,” she will present inspiring examples of human beings who demonstrate heroic dignity and resilience and humanity when facing circumstances that are designed to strip them of their humanity including Gaza, Sudan and death row.

Marlowe's previous films include “Darfur Diaries” and “Rebuilding Hope.” “Rebuilding Hope” follows the homecoming journey to South Sudan of three "Lost Boys," including Le Moyne graduate and Syracuse resident, Gabriel Bol Deng.

Free and open to the public. The event is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies. For more information, call (315) 445-4292.
 


Berrigan Lecture: “Journey to Nonviolence”

David Kaczinski, Executive Director of New Yorkers for Alternatives to the Death Penalty
Janice Grieshaber Geddes, Executive Director of the Jenna Foundation for Nonviolence
Thursday, Oct. 13, 6:30 p.m.
Grewen Auditorium

Janice Grieshaber Geddes and David Kaczynski describe how they were able to transform their personal tragedies resulting from violence into positive missions for social change. In alternating voices, Janice and David will recount their personal journeys - Janice as the mother of a murder victim (Jenna Grieshaber) and David as the brother of a murderer (Ted Kaczynski, AKA "The Unabomber") - and how their paths ultimately converged in their shared work against violence. Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies, the Sanzone Center, International House alumni and the alumni and parent programs office.



Book Presentation: Aurora Luque


Monday, Oct. 3, 4 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

Title:  "Hambre de libertad. Memorias de una embajadora republicana"
(Hunger for Freedom: a Memoir of a Woman Ambassador in the Spanish Republic)

Aurora Luque, a well known Spanish poet, critic, professor and translator, will talk about the Isabel Oyarzábal Smith book "Hambre de libertad. Memorias de una embajadora Republicana" (Hunger for Freedom: a Memoir of a Woman Ambassador in the Spanish Republic." Luque prepared the introduction to this book, written by the author in English and translated into Swedish, but never before into Spanish. She will talk about this really unique and multifaceted woman who lived to defend freedom in a crucial historical time in Spain. This book is a good example of the country's efforts, 25 years after Franco's dictatorship, to restore the Spanish historic memory.


The event will be held in Spanish. Dr. Orlando Ocampo from the foreign languages and literature department will provide the simultaneous English translation.

Open to the public. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Center for Peace & Global Studies, department of foreign languages and literature and the Spanish Club.



Fay Botham: “'The Purity of the White Woman'"

9/29/2011 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM 

Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

Botham’s talk, "'The Purity of the White Woman': Race, Gender and Religion in American Anti-Miscegenation Law and the Future of Gay Marriage," explores the workings of race, gender and Christianity in historical American bans on interracial marriage. She considers the ways in which this history serves as a framework for understanding today's debates over same-sex marriage, and how the "wall of separation" has and has not influenced courts' rulings on marriage and sexual morality.

Botham is assistant professor of religious studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. She is the author of Almighty God Created the Races: Christianity, Interracial Marriage, and American Law, 1865-1967, published by the University of North Carolina Press. 

The event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the gender and women’s studies program, the Center for Peace and Global Studies and the religious studies department.

 

Thinking about 9/11 Ten Years After: First Annual Middle East and Beyond Symposium

Thursday, September 22
This first annual Middle East symposium brings together scholars from Syracuse University, Colgate, Wayne State, Brooklyn College and Loyola Chicago to discuss three important themes: Islamaphobia and 9/11, U.S. and Middle East relations, and Contemporary Uprisings in the Middle East.

The program of events is as follows:

Panel 1: 10 - 11:15 a.m.
“Islamophobia, Surveillance and 911”
Saher Selod (Loyola Chicago), Neelika Jayawardane (SUNY Oswego), Carol Fadda-Conrey (Syracuse University)

Panel 2: 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
“Changes in International Policies since 9/11”
Lisa Bhungalia (Syracuse University) and Dana Olwan (Simon Fraser University)

Panel 3: 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
“Social Movements and Uprisings in the Middle East”
Abdullah Al-arian (Wayne State), Bruce Rutherford (Colgate University) and Robert Zens (Le Moyne College)

Keynote Address: 4 p.m.
Grewen Auditorium
Moustafa Bayoumi: “How Does It Feel To be a Problem? Young Arab and Muslim Americans 10 years after 9/11”

How Does It Feel To be a Problem? Young Arab and Muslim Americans 10 years after 9/11

Event Details   Thursday, Sept. 22, 4 p.m.


Grewen Auditorium
In his 1903 treatise “The Souls of Black Folk,” W.E.B Du Bois asked the question: "How Does It Feel To Be A Problem?" Moustafa Bayoumi approaches this question again a century later. His award-winning book of the same title presents striking portraits of 20-something Arab Americans in Brooklyn who face surveillance and detentions, workplace discrimination, threats of vigilante violence, and the disappearance of friends or family—all trials that have faced the newest population in America to be tagged "problematic." Bayoumi places the young people’s own experiences at the heart of his book, resulting in a series of life stories filled with drive, hope, and the pursuit of a better life. Salon declares these are "people who might be your neighbors, and Bayoumi delivers them with urgency, compassion, wryness and hints of poetry." Bayoumi will lecture about his book and reflect on what it means to be Arab American and Muslim American today, 10 years after the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

Moustafa Bayoumi is the author of “How Does It Feel To Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America” (Penguin), which won an American Book Award and the Arab American Book Award for Non-Fiction. (The book has also been translated into Arabic by Arab Scientific Publishers.) His writings have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, New York Magazine, The National, The Guardian, CNN.com, The London Review of Books, The Nation, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and other places. Bayoumi is also the co-editor of “The Edward Said Reader” (Vintage) and editor of “Midnight on Mavi Marmara: the Attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla and How It Changed the Course of the Israel/Palestine Conflict” (O/R Books). He has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The Chicago Sun-Times, and on CNN, FOX News, Book TV, National Public Radio, and many other media outlets from around the world. Panel discussions on “How Does It Feel To be Problem?” have been convened at The Museum of the City of New York, PEN American Center, Drexel Law School, and the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. Bayoumi is also an occasional columnist for The Progressive Media Project, through which his op-eds appear throughout the United States. He is a professor of English at Brooklyn College, City University of New York and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Miriam Elman:  The ‘Problem’ of Jerusalem: Religion, Politics, and the Negotiation of Sacred Space Event Details  

Event Details   Thursday, March 24, 4 p.m.
Grewen Auditorium

More so than any other issue preventing an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement, disagreements surrounding Jerusalem are considered by both scholars and practitioners to be the major impediment to conflict resolution. In this talk, Miriam F. Elman will discuss how conflict over Jerusalem has contributed to the collapse of previous peace negotiations in general, and to Oslo’s demise in particular. Elman will highlight how Israeli and Palestinian positions on Jerusalem have changed over time, and the extent to which the sacrality of the holy city has shifted and morphed in response to political realities. Considering both historical and contemporary conflict in Jerusalem, Elman’s talk will draw on her new book which examines how different disciplinary lenses contribute to the study of the Jerusalem ‘problem’ and potential avenues for its resolution.

Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies, religious studies and political science. Link to Additional Information   http://faculty.maxwell.syr.edu/melman/

Sam Totten: "From the Holocaust to Darfur, Never Again"

Event Details   Wednesday, Feb. 9, 4 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall
Dr. Samuel Totten, professor of education at the University of Arkansas, is a recognized genocide scholar. He is a member of the Council of the Institute on the Holocaust and Genocide in Jerusalem, Israel, and one of the inaugural chief co-editors of Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal. In 2004, Dr. Totten served as one of 24 investigators on the U.S. State Department's Darfur Atrocities Documentation Project. Most recently, he has conducted research in Rwanda on various aspects of the Rwandan genocide. In 2008, he served as a Fulbright Scholar at the National University of Rwanda, where he developed a new master's degree program in genocide studies for the university.

Long recognized as a leader in Holocaust education, his recent works have focused on issues surrounding understanding genocide. Among the books Dr. Totten has edited/co-edited on genocide are: First-Person Accounts of Genocidal Acts Committed in the Twentieth Century; Teaching and Studying About the Holocaust; Genocide in Darfur: Investigating Atrocities in the Sudan; and We Cannot Forget: Interviews with Survivors of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide.

Dr. Totten recently has returned from Sudan where he conducted a series of interviews with refugees from Darfur and from the genocide perpetrated in the Nuba mountains in the early 1990s. He will be speaking about his work in Darfur and Rwanda. The event is free and open to the public and is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies.
Link to Additional Information   http://coehp.uark.edu/2140.htm

 

2010

A Celebration of Le Moyne's Global Outreach and a Jesuit Education

Event Details  : A Celebration of Le Moyne's Global Outreach and a Jesuit Education: Honoring the Work of Gabriel Bol Deng '07 and J. Barron Boyd Jr.
Thursday, Oct. 14, 8 p.m.
Panasci Family Chapel
Join us for a celebration of the success of Hope for Ariang, a nonprofit humanitarian organization dedicated to providing educational opportunities and health services for the Sudanese people adversely affected by the ongoing conflict within that nation.

Hope was founded by Le Moyne alumnus Gabriel Bol Deng ’07, a native of Sudan who was inspired in part by his experience at the College to provide educational opportunities for the children of his village. Along with Interim Dean of Arts and Sciences J. Barron Boyd Jr., he recently saw that goal begin to come to fruition with the start of construction of a school there. Both men will share their experiences in working on this project, as well as photos of their trip to Sudan early this year.

In addition, Jennifer Marlowe’s documentary, Rebuilding Hope, chronicling Gabriel’s return to Sudan years after war forced him to flee for his safety as a child, will be shown, beginning at 9 p.m.

This event is free and open to the public.
Link to Additional Information   http://www.hopeforariang.org

Tamara Sonn: Muslim and Catholic Interfaith Solidarity

Event Details   Monday, Oct. 4, 4 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall
In 1964 the Vatican set up a Secretariat for Non-Christians, later renamed the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, to be a resource for the Vatican, to engage in dialogues with people of other faiths, and to encourage similar dialogue at the local level throughout the world. In 1965 the Church issued Nostra aetate, for the first time addressing religious plurality from a positive perspective. Guidelines for respectful and open dialogue developed gradually, but left unanswered were the questions of evangelization and conversion. Evangelization – the effort to spread the “good news” of Jesus as the Messiah and Savior – is an essential part of the Church’s mission. And conversion is the goal of evangelization. But in the years since the declaration of Nostra aetate, there have been significant developments in our understanding of both evangelization and conversion.

This lecture will survey developments in the Church’s understanding of evangelization and conversion, covering the controversies surrounding Liberation Theology. It will conclude with the insights of long-time Vatican official – currently Apostolic Nuncio to Egypt and delegate to the Arab League -- Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald and John Borelli, formerly with the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and currently Special Assistant to the President (of Georgetown University) for Interreligious Initiatives – both of whom have focused on Muslim-Catholic dialogue.

Her conversation will conclude with reflections on 911, the ground zero mosque and the increase of Islamaphobia.

Sonn is the Kenan Professor of Religion and Humanities at the College of William and Mary. She holds a doctorate in Near Eastern languages and civilizations from the University of Chicago. Soon is the author of "A Brief History of Islam."

Free and open to the public. For more information, call the Center for Peace and Global Studies at (315) 445-4294.

Responding to Dr. Finkelstein: Gaza and the Mavi Mamara

Event Details   Tuesday, Sept. 28, 4 p.m.
As a follow-up to the lecture by American academic Norman Finkelstein that took place on September 16, the peace and global studies program has organized a panel, "Responding to Finkelstein," with the following speakers: Ken Frieden, B. G. Rudolph Professor of Judaic Studies, Syracuse University; and Robert Zens, assistant professor of history, Le Moyne College. David McCallum, S.J., special assistant to the president for strategic development, will moderate the discussion.

Many Faces, Many Stories, Many Traditions: Sudanese ‘Lost Boys’ and ‘Lost Girls’

Event Details   Saturday, Sept. 25, 2:30 p.m.
Grewen Auditorium
Come and hear the stories of the ‘Lost Boys’ and ‘Lost Girls’ of Sudan, who were displaced by the war there.

Sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies, the Center for Urban and Regional Applied Research (CURAR) and St. Vincent de Paul Church.

Link to Additional Information   http://blog.syracuse.com/opinion/2010/09/program_at_lemoyne_will_explor.html

 Event   Norman Finkelstein: "Israel and Palestine After the Flotilla"

Date   9/16/2010

 Event Details   Le Moyne College will host a talk by American academic Norman Finkelstein on Thursday, Sept. 16, at 5 p.m. in Grewen Auditorium. The title of his talk is “Israel and Palestine after the Flotilla.”

In his talk, Finkelstein will discuss the Israeli commando raid on a humanitarian flotilla destined for Gaza in May that left nine passengers dead.

He is the author of several books, including "Beyond Chutzpah: On the Misuse of Anti-Semitism and the Abuse of History," "The Holocaust Industry: Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering" and "Image and Reality of the Israeli-Palestine Conflict," among others.

Finkelstein received a doctorate from Princeton University. He has taught at Brooklyn College, Rutgers University, Hunter College, New York University and DePaul University. He is currently an independent scholar.

The lecture is free and open to the public. This presentation is part on an ongoing series of lectures at Le Moyne looking at the problem of peace in the Middle East. The series has included talks by notable experts on both sides of the question, including Dr. Gerald Steinberg, professor of political science at Bar Ilan University (Israel) and periodic foreign policy adviser to the Israeli government and Sandy Tolan, author of The Lemon Tree: An Arab, A Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East and associate professor at the Annenberg School of Journalism at the University of Southern California.

As a follow-up to Dr. Finkelstein's lecture, the peace and global studies program has organized a panel, "Responding to Finkelstein," with the following speakers: Ken Frieden, B. G. Rudolph Professor of Judaic Studies, Syracuse University; Robert Zens, assistant professor of history, Le Moyne College; and Jennifer Glancy, professor of religious studies, Le Moyne College. The panel will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 28, at 4 p.m. in the Reilley Room. David McCallum, S.J., special assistant to the president for strategic development, will moderate the discussion.

In March 2011, Miriam Elman, associate professor, department of political science at Syracuse University and faculty research director, International and Intra-state Conflicts in the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), will speak on the continuing significance of Jerusalem. Her talk is titled “The ‘Problem’ of Jerusalem: Religion, Politics, and the Negotiation of Sacred Space.”

The Finkelstein lecture is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies and the religious studies and political science departments at Le Moyne. For more information, call (315) 445-4294.

Link to Additional Information   http://www.normanfinkelstein.com

 

2009

21st Annual Peace Studies Conference

A project of the Central New York Peace Studies Consortium

Saturday, Nov. 14, 2009

Program Theme: Youth, Drugs, Violence, and Gangs: Global, national and local challenges - From Martin L. King Jr. to Mahatma Gandhi, peacemakers have recognized the importance of teaching our young people how to live in peace. Thousands of youth are murdered and tens of thousands of them are arrested each year in the United States alone. The challenge of protecting our children is complicated when some of them are involved in generating the violence. Younger and younger children are carrying guns and selling drugs and the attraction of gangs and thug culture is strong in many communities. Around the world, organized illegal trafficking (including drugs, arms and human beings) poses an international threat to peace and global security. A peaceful future depends on meeting the challenges of violence at all levels, including developing alternatives for youth in our own communities.

Sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies and the Center for Urban and Regional Applied Research (CURAR).

World Premiere of "Rebuilding Hope"

Sat., Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m.

Pre-movie cocktail party, 5:30 p.m.

Palace Theatre, 2384 James Street, Syracuse

World premiere of the film "Rebuilding Hope," a film about Gabriel Bol Deng ’07 and two other Sudanese "Lost Boys," Koor Garang and Garang Mayuol, who return to Southern Sudan to look for surviving family members and rediscover and contribute to their homeland. Award-winning filmmaker Jen Marlowe, as well as the young men featured in the film will be available to answer questions following the screening.

The film also explores the connections between the conflict in southern Sudan and conflicts in other parts of the country, including Darfur, nearly three years after the signing of the fragile Comprehensive Peace Agreement, probing the larger questions of identity and ethnicity and taking a pulse on the southern Sudanese people's hopes and fears for the future.

Admission to the film is $25. Tickets for the pre-film cocktail party and film are $100. All proceeds will go

 to the projects of the three men documented in the film. For more information, visit the Web site listed below or www.hopeforariang.org.

A Conversation with George McGovern

Mon., Sept. 28, 7 p.m.

Grewen Auditorium

George McGovern has had a long and distinguished career in public service, serving as a representative, senator, ambassador, and Democratic presidential nominee.

McGovern was first elected to Congress in 1956 and was reelected in 1958. President John F. Kennedy named him the first director of the Food for Peace Program and Special Assistant to the President in 1961. ln this position he oversaw the donation of millions of tons of food to developing nations, and helped create the World Food Program.

McGovern was then elected to the Senate in 1962 and reelected in 1968 and 1974. As a member of the Senate committees on Agriculture, Nutrition, & Forestry, Foreign Relations, and the Joint Economic 4 Committee, he led the way in expanding key domestic nutrition programs.

Following his bid for the presidency in 1972, McGovern was named by President Gerald Ford as a United · Nations delegate to the General Assembly and, in 1978, President Jimmy Carter named him a United Nations delegate for the Special Session on Disarmament. He served as United States Ambassador to the UN Agencies in Rome, appointed by President Clinton, where he took a lead role in promoting feeding children in school around the world.

A World War Il fighter pilot and war hero, McGovern will long be remembered for his courage in speaking out against U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. He is a major subject of historian Stephen Ambrose‘s book, "A Band of Brothers."

Last year, Senator McGovern and Senator Bob Dole were awarded the prestigious World Food Prize for their work to reach "millions of the world‘s poorest children, especially girls" with school feeding and better nutrition.

Following his talk, McGovern will sign copies of his new book, "Abraham Lincoln," which is part of the Time-Life book series on American presidents. The event is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne and is free and open to the public.

Anatomy of an Embed: Reporting from Afghanistan

Tuesday, March 31, 4:30 p.m.

Reilly Room, Reilly Hall

Steve Featherstone — regular contributor to Harper’s Magazine, photographer, radio producer, and Syracuse native — will present on his experiences as an embedded journalist in Afghanistan. Featherstone went to Afghanistan in 2007, on assignment for Harper’s. His essays, photographs, and short stories have been published in a wide variety of media, including Granta, Oxford American, The Walrus, Popular Science, Slate.com, and National Public Radio, among many others. His cover story for Harper’s about military robots (Feb. 07) was selected for the 2008 volume of Best American Science & Nature Writing. He is currently writing an article for I-larper’s about handguns. Featherstone will be on campus for two days, March 30-31, as the Communication Program’s 2009 Journalist-in-Residence. He will be visiting classes and conducting a writing workshop for students. For more information, please contact Prof. Dan Roche at 445-5470 or rochedm@lemoyne.edu.

Argentine Educator and Labor Attorney Visit Le Moyne

On Monday, January 26, and Tuesday, January 27, Le Moyne will host two visitors from Argentina. Hugo Paez Padro is an administrator and instructor at the National Catholic University of Argentina at its Mendoza campus. Mr. Paez is trained as a sociologist and economist. Haydee Grillo de Paez is an attorney who practices labor law in Mendoza. She is an active member of a Jesuit-lay team that offers the Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius. During their two-day visit, our Argentine guests will visit classes, meet with administrators and faculty, and lead discussions on a variety of topics. For further information, contact Bob Kelly at: kellyrf@lemoyne.edu .

2008

Wilson Art Gallery Hosts Exhibit: "The Art in War"

An exhibit of the work of Benjamin Busch will be on display in the Wilson Art Gallery of the Noreen Reale Falcone Library at Le Moyne College. The exhibit, titled "The Art in War," opens on Thursday, Oct. 23, and will run through Friday, Nov. 14, and can be seen during regular library hours (Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to midnight; Saturday and Sunday from noon to 8 p.m.).

Benjamin Busch was born in 1968 in Manhattan and grew up in rural central New York. He graduated from Vassar College in 1991 with a major in studio art and soon thereafter accepted a commission in the United States Marine Corps. Busch served four years as an active duty infantry officer and then from 1996 to the 2006 in the Selected Marine Reserve. ln 1997 he turned to acting and had small appearances in "Party of Five" and "Homicide." He deployed to lraq in 2003 as the commanding officer of Delta Company, 4th Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, and then again in 2005 with a civil affairs unit in Ar Ramadi.

The images in his photographic exhibits, "The Art in War" (2003) and "Occupation" (2005), are from these two deployments. ln 2004, he began playing the role of Officer Anthony Coliechio on the HBO series "The Wire," now in its final season, and has just wrapped the new HBO series, "Generation Kill," in Africa. His first film as a writer/director, "Sympathetic Details," was released in February of 2008 and is making its award-winning international film festival tour now.

A new exhibit of photographs, "Abstract Matter," and his final exhibit of new images from 1raq,"Patrols," are due later this year. He lives in Michigan with his wife, Tracy, and their three- year—old daughter, Alexandra.

Michaele Ferguson: "Bitch is the New Black"

Bitch is the New Black": Feminism and the Failure to Think lntersectionally About the Obama Campaign

Wed., Oct. 22, 4 — 6 p.m.

Speaker: Michaele Ferguson

Grewen Auditorium

Ferguson diagnoses the difficulty that mainstream feminists had during the primary season reading Obama’s speech on race and Father’s Day speech as not only raced, but also gendered and sexed. Many feminists, she argues, were trapped in strict categorical thinking that treats race and gender as separate and unrelated phenomena. Consequently, feminist supporters of Hillary Clinton could — without a trace of irony — call on Obama to give a speech on gender to complement his earlier speech on race. Ferguson argues that `Obama’s speeches on race and fatherhood reflect at best a commitment to conventional gender roles, and at worst an exclusive commitment to the nuclear, heterosexual, reproductive family. Moreover, Obama’s blaming of black fathers for racial inequality relieves white guilt and resonates with neoconservative anti- welfare state racism in ways that we ought to find troubling.

Michaele Ferguson is an assistant professor in the department of political science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her interests include democratic theory, feminist theory, the role of truth in politics, and the philosophy of language. Her most recent publication explores all of these themes via an analysis of the use of feminist rhetoric to justify the U.S. foreign policy of building democracies in Afghanistan and  lraq: "W Stands for Women: Feminism and Security Rhetoric in the Post-9/1 I Bush Administration," which appeared in Politics & Gender in 2005. She is also the co-editor with Lori Marso of Union College of a volume of essays further developing these themes titled "W Stands for Women: How the George W. Bush Presidency Has Shaped a New Politics of Gender" (Duke University Press, 2007). Her work has appeared in Hypatia, Theory & Event, The European Legacy, and Philosophy in Review. She is currently working on a book manuscript titled "Sharing Democracy."

Wounds of War Lecture Series

Tues., Oct. 7, 7 p.m.

Panasci Family Chapel

Mary Trotochaud and Rick McDowell will speak about displaced Iraqis within Iraq, They have led 15 · delegations to Iraq since 1996 and moved to Baghdad in 2003 for two years to work with emerging civil society organizations and to coordinate relief and development projects for American Friends Service Committee.

The goal of this lecture series, which includes people from a variety of faith communities, is to make people more aware of the impact of the war in Iraq. For more information, contact (315) 445-4114

Human Rights Activist and Best-selling Author John Prendergast to Speak at Le Moyne College

Human rights activist and author John Prendergast, who regularly travels to Africa’s war zones on missions of peace, will discuss his work at Le Moyne College on Wednesday, April 9, at 7 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel. The title of his talk is "Stopping Genocide in Darfur: What You Can Do."

Prendergast is co—chair of the ENOUGH Project, which is dedicated to ending genocide and crimes against humanity. As a diplomat during the Clinton administration, he was directly involved in a number of peace processes throughout Africa, including the peace deal between Ethiopia and Eritrea. Prendergast has also worked for the U.S. Department of State, members of Congress and the United Nations. He is a visiting professor at the University of San Diego and the American University in Cairo. .

Prendergast has authored eight books on Africa, the latest of which he co-authored with actor/activist Don Cheadle, titled "Not on Our Watch; The Mission to End Genocide in Darfur and Beyond," a New York Times bestseller. A book-signing will follow the talk.

This event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne College. For more information, contact (315) 445-4294,

Journalism Adventures in the Former Soviet Union V

Wed., April 2, 7 p.m.

Drescher Community Room, Panasci Family Chapel

Margie Freaney, a veteran reporter, editor and international journalism educator, will discuss the challenges of covering the news in the former Soviet Union and beyond. Freaney, a 1967 Le Moyne College alumna, is a former knight fellow in Slovakia and the founding academic director of the Caucasus School of Journalism in Tbilisi, Georgia. She frequently conducts overseas training of journalists for the International Center for Journalists in Washington, D.C., and was an executive editor of the Atlanta (Ga.) Business Chronicle (1997-1999) and editor of the Baltimore Business Journal (1994-1997). Prior to that, she served as executive editor of Record Newspapers in Long Island, New York. Freaney will also conduct a business reporting workshop earlier in the day on Wednesday. Members of the campus community are welcome to attend the workshop from 2:30 to 4 p.m. in Reilly Hall 339. For more information, contact Michael Streissguth at streismj@lemoyne.edu or at 445-4261. This event is sponsored by the communication program, the Center for Peace and Global Studies and the Association for Students in Communication.

2007

Le Moyne College to be Host Site for World Food Day Teleconference

Le Moyne College will join in a worldwide teleconference on hunger and poverty on World Food Day, Tuesday, October I6, from noon - 3 p.m. in the Reilly Room. The theme of the three-hour program, which will be broadcast live from Washington, D.C., is "Climate: Changes, Challenges and Consequences?

The overwhelming majority of the world's climate scientists are convinced that the Earth is in the midst of a period of potentially severe climate change caused by the activities of mankind. This year’s World Food Day Teleconference will examine the many crosscutting issues of global climate change and the potentially disastrous consequences for the millions of poor and chronically undernourished people. Avoiding this looming crisis will require immediate and farsighted action by all nations.

The first hour of the teleconference will feature interviews with three international experts on issues of climate, the environment and agriculture: Suzanne Hunt, an independent consultant and authority on the _ topic of bioenergy issues; Dr. Cynthia Rosenzweig, senior research scientist and leader of the Climate Impacts Group at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies at Columbia University; and Dr. Stephen Schneider, professor of interdisciplinary environmental studies and civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University and a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Moderating the event will be PBS senior correspondent Ray Suarez. Two documentary films, "The Millennium Development Goals" and "The Ecological Footprint," will be shown in the second hour. The third hour will be a live call—in show between host sites and the panel. 

Continuing education credits for teleconference participation will be provided through Marywood University for interested clergy and social service professionals. The American Dietetic Association gives 3 CEUS for registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, and the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences has approved three Professional Development Units (PDUS) for its members.

For more information, call Lawrence Tanner at 445-4537 or visit the event Web site.

http://www.worldfooddayusa.org/

Lecture: Medical Anthropology in Practice Around the World

"Integrating Anthropology and Epidemiology on the Roof of the World, at the Bottom of the World, and around the World: Applied Medical Anthropology in Practice; Experiences from Antarctica, Tibet, Africa, and Latin America"

Timothy De Ver Dye, Ph.D.

Friday, October I2, 2:30 p.m.

Reilly Room, Reilly Hall

Professor Timothy Dye is vice president of global health systems for Axios International, a company specializing in health care systems, and an adjunct professor of community and preventative medicine at the University of Rochester. He specializes in global health affairs and is the founding director of several academic organizations and centers, including: the Women’s and Children’s Health Care Research Center at the State University of New York’s Upstate Medical University, the Division of Public Health at the University of Rochester, and the Center for Global Health at the University of Rochester.

Lynn Davidman: Religious Disaffiliation and the Transformation of Bodily Practices

Thursday, October 11, 7 p.m.

Grewen Auditorium

Lynn Davidman is a professor of Judaic studies, American civilization and gender studies at Brown University. She has written extensively about women and religion, women and Judaism and gender and religion, including "Tradition in a Rootless World: Women Turn to Orthodox Judaism" (University of California Press, 1991). Her forthcoming book is titled "Leaving I-Iome: Exiting Orthodox Judaism in Israel and the United States." For more information, call (315) 445-4385.

 Professor Davidman‘s visit is sponsored by the religious studies department with additional support from the Sociology Club, the O‘Connell Professorship, and the gender and women‘s studies program.

Kiskis Lecture: "Domestic Twain: How Sam Clemens' Domestic Sphere Affected His Work"

Tuesday, October 2, 6 p.m. r

Reilly Room, Reilly Hall

Dr. Michael Kiskis of Elmira College, editor of "Mark Twain‘s Own Autobiography: The Chapters from the North American Review," will present a paper titled "Domestic Twain: How Sam Clemens' Domestic Sphere affected his work." He will particularly address Twain‘s complicated response to the cult of domesticity in nineteenth-century America, as well as his response to the emerging issue of child abuse.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

Don Winkelmann, Woodrow Wilson Scholar

Thursday, April 12th,

Grewen Auditorium at 7 p.m.

Don Winkelmann, Former Chairman, Technical Advisory Committee, Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research

Topics: Immigration into the US. resolving developing country poverty through sustainable agriculture; the effects of agriculture on the environment—managing better from Kansas to Kenya; genetically modified organisms, poverty, ethics—recognizing the potentials and the trade-offs; globalization—upsides and downsides.

Le Moyne Hosts Presentation on Crisis in Darfur

As part of a semester-long focus on the topic of genocide, Le Moyne College’s film program and the Center for Peace and Global Studies will present a video, lecture and discussion on Tuesday, March I3, From 4 — 5:45 p.m., in Grewen Auditorium.

Dr. Darius Oliha Makuja, professor of religious studies, will speak on "Avoiding Using the ‘G’ Word in Darfur: A Moral Dilemma for the International Community? In addition, a video from an episode of “Now" with Bill Moyers will be shown dealing with the crisis in Darfur followed by discussion led by Makuja.

Le Moyne College to Host Talk by Former Ambassador to Guatemala

Le Moyne College will host a talk by Donald J. Planty, former ambassador to Guatemala, on Wednesday, February 21, at 7 p.m. in Grewen Auditorium. His talk is titled "The U.S. Policy in Latin America: Good Neighbor or Bad?"

The event is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne and is free and open to the public.

 Le Moyne College to Host Talk at Palace Theater by Paul Rusesabagina

Le Moyne College will host a visit by Rwandan Paul Rusesabagina on Thursday, February 15, at 6:30 p.m. at the Palace Theater on James Street. His talk is titled"‘A‘Lesson Yet to be Learned."

Rusesabagina’s visit is sponsored by the film program and the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne, along with OFRC, Le Moyne Student Programming Board, African-American History Month Committee, the O‘Connell Professorship, gender and women’s studies, the Film Club, the Political Science Academy, the political science department, the Honors Program, the Lecture Committee, the religious studies department, the history department, and the philosophy department. For more information, call 445-4292.

Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer to Speak at Le Moyne College

The Syracuse Chapter of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, and Le Moyne College will host two talks by anthropologist Diane Gifford Gonzalez on Friday, February 16, at 3:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Both lectures will be held in Grewen Auditorium on the Le Moyne campus.

The lecture is co-sponsored by the Center for Urban and Regional Applied Research, the Center for Peace and Global Studies, the developing Center for the Study of Environmental Change at Le Moyne and the lecture committee.

 

2006

 Alumni, Dr. Bernard "Ben" Stancati '76 Visits LeMoyne

Retired United States Air Force Colonel and adjunct professor at both Colorado Technical University and ·Webster University's Denver campus will visit LeMoyne College Monday, October 23rd— Wednesday, October 25th. He will present a lecture entitled "The Canada-US Bi-National Planning Group: Bridging a Gap in a Defense and Security Partnership" at 2:30p.m. in Gl-I 417 on Tuesday, October 24. Sponsored by The Center for Peace and Global Studies.

The Center for Peace and Global Studies to Host Author Philip J. Hilts.

The Center for Peace and Global Studies will host Philip J J-lilg, author of six books, and prize—winning health and science reporter for both the New York TW Washington Post. His most recent book, "RX for Survival" has just been published in conjunction with a six-part series on Public Television. Hilts‘

talk, “Hope and Hazard: Globalization and Human Health” will cover the "big picture" on health, wealth, and national interest. He will specifically address bird flu and other pandemic diseases, such as AIDS in Africa.

Angelo D’Agostino, SJ Receives Honorary Degree

Angelo D'Agostino, SJ will be receiving an Honorary Degree from Le Moyne on Monday, October 2 at 7p.m. in the Panasci Chapel. The title of his keynote address will be “The Present Plight of Orphans in Africa and the Future Catastrophe of 40 million by 20l5." This event is sponsored by the President’s Office and the Center for Peace and Global Studies.

November 30: Turkey: on Europe’s verge (presenter: Stamatios Kyrkos, assistant professor of physics) All lectures begin at 5:30 p.m. (followed by cocktails at 6130 p.m.) (Dinner, a la carte, is available after the lecture; reservations are required.)

Great Decisions is a Global Affairs Education Program developed to engage citizens in learning about the world. The Corinthian Club, home to The George and Rebecca Barnes Foundation, promotes an exchange of ideas and information through discussion and programs sponsored and supported by its members.

Le Moyne College Receives Grant from U.S. Department of Education

Le Moyne College has received a grant from the U.S. Department of Education for "Globalizing the Le Moyne Core: Exploring Justice in an interdependent World.” The intent of the program is to enhance the "global literacy" of Le Moyne’s 2400 undergraduates and to improve their understanding of the justice dimensions of global issues.

 The grant, which runs from July 2006 until June 2008 and totals approximately $170,000, will fund a three» week field experience in China, South Africa or Jordan/Israel for selected faculty who teach in the core curriculum. Under the guidance of experienced Le Moyne faculty mentors, the selected faculty members will participate in seminars focusing on justice issues in the various parts of the world before their field work. Upon their return, they will be required to develop new, or revise existing, courses offered in the core curriculum.

The grant will also allow development of prototype foreign language courses integrating language study and a specific content area of the core -» philosophy, religious studies or history. This prototype will serve as a model for greater integration of language courses into the core curriculum by linking history, philosophy, and religious studies -- which are in the core-— with French and Spanish, which currently are not. 

The grant also provides support for speakers, library holdings and course development.  Le Moyne was one of only 22 colleges to receive a grant under the DOE’s highly competitive Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Languages program.  lt is the second such grant for Le Moyne College. 

The proposal was written by co—directors Barron Boyd, of the Center for Peace and Global Studies; Jennifer Glancy, religious studies; Leonard Marsh, chair of modern languages; and Frank Ridzi, sociology. The initiative represents part of be Moyne College’s response to the call by the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities to make consideration of justice in a global context an element of every Jesuit educational experience.  When complete, this project will help Le Moyne faculty incorporate global issues and global justice themes into the common educational core of all Le Moyne students and will develop a prototype of language courses that combine study in core areas with language instruction. In this way, it is anticipated that the campus community will have an enhanced level of "g1obal literacy" and a greater appreciation of the normative aspects of world politics.

Le Moyne College will host a talk by Dr. S. Irfan Habib on "The Search for an Islamic Science"

on Friday, March 31, at 3:30 p.m. in Grewen Auditorium

Habib, a scientist at the National Institute of Science Technology and Development Studies in New Delhi, is a well-known scholar of the history of science and the first person to ask incisive questions about Islamic science in nineteenth-century India. His publications include "Domesticating Modern Science: Essays on Social History of Science and Culture in Colonial lndia" (2004) and "Situating the History of Science: Dialogues with Joseph Needham" (1999), both written with Dhruv Raina. Forthcoming books include a biography of the scientist Ramchandra and two edited collections, "The Social History of Science in India: A Reader" and "History of the Scientific and Cultural Development of Humanity?

Habib has been awarded a number of fellowships to carry out research in France. In addition, he serves on the editorial board of the Asian Journal of International Studies, is vice president of the International Association on Science and Cultural Diversity (Mexico), associate editor of Quipu — A Multi-Cultural Journal of History and Science (Spain), book review editor for Science Technology & Society: An International Journal Devoted to the Developing World, and a member of the Expert Committee of International Union of History and Philosophy of Science project on the Online Dictionary of history of science bibliography and archival resources. He holds a bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and doctorate from Meerut University in India.

The program is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne in collaboration with SUNY Oswego and the Fulbright Visiting Specialists Program: Direct Access to the Muslim World Program. For more information, call 445-4294.

Reflections on the Fate of Human Rights

presented by Lavonne Mueller

February 16, 2006

Le Moyne College will host a talk by award-winning playwright and poet Lavonne Mueller on Thursday, February 16, at 7 p.m. in the Reilley Room, located in Reilly Hall.

During her presentation, titled “Reflections on the Fate of Human Rights,” Mueller will read sections from her plays “Hotel Splendid,” “The Mothers” (about the mothers of the disappeared in Argentina), and “Letters to a Daughter from Prison” (about the father-daughter relationship of Nehru and Indira in India). She will also speak about the role of human rights in the future.

Mueller, a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, was awarded the Roger Stevens Playwriting Award which she received at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. She has received a Guggenheim grant, a Rockefeller grant, three National Endowment for the Arts grants, a Fulbright to Argentina, an Asian Culture Council grant to Calcutta, and a U.S. Friendship grant to Japan. Her plays have been published by Dramatist Play Service, Samuel French, Applause Books, Performing Arts Journal, Theatre Communication Group, Heinemann Books and Baker’s Plays. Her textbook, “Creative Writing,” published by Doubleday and The National Textbook Company, is used by students around the world. She has taught at Columbia University for five years.

In addition to the lecture, Major Arcana at Le Moyne will be presenting Mueller’s “Voices from the Storm Clouds” Thursday through Saturday, February 16 – 18, at 8 p.m. in the Marren Studio of the W. Carroll Coyne Center for the Performing Arts. The performance will feature a series of short plays and monologues written by Mueller that focus on the period between World War II and the 9/11 destruction of the World Trade Towers. The scenes are primarily based on eyewitness accounts and first-hand experiences of events.

"What Are Israel's Options After the Palestian Elections"

presented by

February 7, 2006

The political landscape in the Middle East has changed dramatically in recent weeks, following Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s stroke and the Palestinian Hamas election landslide.

Dr. Gerald Steinberg, professor of political studies at Bar Ilan University in Israel, will discuss the current situation in the Middle East on Tuesday, February 7, at 1 p.m. in Grewen Auditorium at Le Moyne College. The title of his talk is “What Are Israel's Options After the Palestinian Elections?”

Steinberg directs the Interdisciplinary Program on Conflict Management and Negotiation at Bar Ilan University. In addition, he serves as a senior research associate at the Begin-Sadat (BESA) Center for Strategic Studies.

He specializes in Middle East diplomatic and security issues, with an emphasis on arms control and CBMs, Middle East peace efforts, Israeli foreign and security policy, and the U.S.-Israeli relationship. He is also a consultant to the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs and National Security Council, has spoken at OSCE Mediterranean Seminars, and participates in a number of the track-two workshops on Middle East Arms Control and Regional Security.

His op ed columns have appeared in numerous publications, including the Jerusalem Post, the Wall Street Journal, Toronto Globe and Mail, Financial Times, National Review Online, and International Herald Tribune. In addition, he has been a frequent commentator on CBS News, NPR, and BBC.

Recent academic publications include "Europe's Failed Middle East Policies," "NGOs Against Israel" and "The Impact of the Failure of Oslo on Israeli Politics."

The program is free and open to the public. It is co-sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne College and the Program on the Analysis and Resolution of Conflicts (PARC) at Syracuse University.

Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

presented by Bethaida Gonzalez

January 25, 2006

 Le Moyne College will hold its annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on Wednesday, January 25, at 5:30 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel.

The evening's keynote speaker will be Bethaida Gonzalez, president of the Syracuse Common Council and interim dean of continuing education/University College, Syracuse University.

Active in the community, Gonzalez has served on the Eleanor Roosevelt Legacy Committee, the Syracuse Onondaga Drug and Alcohol Abuse Commission, and the Syracuse Metropolitan Transportation Council, as well as on the boards of the Center of Community Alternatives, Syracuse Stage, and the Rosamond Gifford Foundation. She was honored by Syracuse University with the Chancellor’s Citation for Distinguished Service in 2005 and received the Peace Action of Central New York Award the same year. Gonzalez holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University Center of New York at Binghamton and a certificate in public administration and master’s degree from The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

The program will include presentation of the Matteo Ricci, S.J., Award for Achievement in Diversity. In addition, winners of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Essay Contest will be announced.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, please call 445-4525.

2005

 

Le Moyne College Celebrates Einstein's "Annus Mirabilus"

Albert Einstein published five papers in 1905 that revolutionized science and society. He was perhaps the most important of the twentieth-century scientists; a political activist, public intellectual, socialist, atheist, and popular cultural icon. His scientific ideas inspired the work of other scientists, intellectuals and artists. His political views influenced the subsequent shape and direction of international politics. His status as a cultural icon shaped ideas in the popular media about intellectual endeavor.

Le Moyne College will celebrate the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein’s “miracle year” on Thursday, November 17, with a variety of events in Grewen Auditorium, culminating in a talk and book signing by Alan Lightman of MIT, author of “Einstein’s Dreams.”

2005 Annual Conference of the CNY Peace Studies Consortium

The Annual Conference of the Central New York Peace Consortium is being held at Le Moyne College this year on Saturday, November 19, 2005. This year’s theme is “Paradigms in Peace Making & Peace Keeping”, featuring keynote speaker Colman McCarthy, syndicated columnist; Professor, Georgetown University Law Center; Founder, Center for Teaching Peace, will be the keynote speaker at the Central New York Peace Studies Consortium, November 19th, 2005. His latest book, “I’d Rather Teach Peace,” is a journal of his experience as a teacher, and offers an alternative to organized violence.

As we move into the 21st Century it is important to examine the different paradigms of peace keeping/peace making as they have evolved and as they are evolving. Are we moving away from a state-centric approach to conflict management with an increased role for non-government actors and regional or international organizations, or have the recent events in Afghanistan and Iraq reified unilateralist impulses? What role do local organizations and even individuals have in peacemaking?

For the conference schedule and location information please visit our website at www.peaceconsortium.org or call 315-445-4292.

Le Moyne College to be Host Site for World Food Day Teleconference

Le Moyne College will join in a worldwide teleconference on hunger on World Food Day, Friday October 14, from noon – 3 p.m. in Grewen Auditorium. The three hour program, titled “Reflections on Fighting Hunger: Roads Not Taken; Goals Not Met; the Journey Ahead,” will be broadcast live from Washington D.C.

Decisions affecting the state of food insecurity in the world take place at all levels and in many places from civil society meetings to corporate board rooms to U.N. conferences. Politics, broadly defined, is “the art of allocating resources” or “who gets what, when and how.” In spite of summits and studies and surveys indicating a high degree of support for ending hunger, the world community has been unable to meet the goal of cutting hunger in half by 2015, much less of achieving a world free of hunger. This year’s program will examine the human-made causes of hunger and the significance of our everyday choices in creating a world free of hunger. The 22nd World Food Day Teleconference will feature Frances Moore Lappé, author of more than a dozen books and co-founder of two national organizations. Lappé’s books have been used in a broad array of courses in hundreds of colleges and universities. She has been a visiting scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has lectured widely to university audiences, community groups and professional conferences and has received 17 honorary doctorates. In 1987 in Sweden, she became the fourth American to receive the Right Livelihood Award, sometimes called the “Alternative Nobel” for her “vision and work healing our planet and uplifting humanity.” Ms. Lappé has received numerous other awards including the Rachel Carson Award. In addition, there will be a live uplink featuring Dr. Pedro Sanchez from the World Food Prize ceremonies in Iowa and a taped cameo commentary by Dr. Wangari Maathai, the first African woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, and Le Moyne College honorary degree recipient. Continuing Education Credits for teleconference participation will be provided through Marywood University for interested clergy and social service professionals. The American Dietetic Association gives CEUS for registered dietitians and dietetic technicians and the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences has approved Professional Development Units (PDUS) for its members. The event is free and open to the public. The Le Moyne broadcast is being co-sponsored by the Food Bank on Central New York. For more information, contact Ted Shepard, professor of economics at Le Moyne, at 445-4235, or Nancy Piscitell at the Center for Peace and Global Studies at 445-4294.

Author Russell Banks to Speak at Le Moyne College

Russell Banks will speak at Le Moyne College on Thursday, October 6, at 6:30 p.m. in the W. Carroll Coyne Center for the Performing Arts.

Banks is presently New York State Author and has written many works of fiction, including “Rule of the Bone,” “Continental Drift,” “The Sweet Hereafter,” “Affliction,” “Cloudsplitter,” and a collection of short stories, “The Angel on the Roof.” Banks' most recent novel is “The Darling,” a beautifully written and fascinating historical novel about imperialism, radical politics, and family relationships that takes place in upstate New York and Liberia. Banks' reading will be followed by a question-and-answer period and a book signing in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center. This event is sponsored by Le Moyne College’s English department and film program; the O’Connell Professorship; the Committee on Diversity and Student Development; the dean of arts and sciences; the Integral Honors Program; the Center for Peace and Global Studies; the creative writing program; and the Film Club. The lecture is free, although seating is limited. The event will also be intranet simulcast to Grewen Auditorium at Le Moy

Le Moyne College Hosts Poetry Reading by Palestinian-American

Le Moyne College will host a reading by poet Lisa Suhair Majaj on Tuesday, October 4, at 7 p.m. in the Reilley Room, located in Reilly Hall. The reading is free and open to the public; a reception will follow.

Lisa Suhair Majaj, a Palestinian American and author of “These Words,” a poetry chapbook, has also published poetry and creative nonfiction in World Literature Today, Visions International, South Atlantic Quarterly, The Women’s Review of Books, The Atlanta Review, “The Poetry of Arab Women: A Contemporary Anthology,” and “The Space Between Our Footsteps: Poems and Paintings from the Middle East.” She has also co-edited three collections of critical essays: “Going Global: The Transnational Reception of Third World Women Writers, “Etel Adnan: Critical Essays on the Arab-American Writer and Artist,” and “Intersections: Gender, Nation and Community in Arab Women’s Novels.” She lives in Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sudanese Community Holds Remembrance for John Gerang at Le Moyne College

The Sudanese Community Association of Syracuse will hold a remembrance ceremony for John Garang, the vice president of the Sudan who was killed August 1 in a helicopter crash near the border of Uganda. In Sudanese culture, after 40 days a ceremony is held in honor of the departed one. The observance will take place on Saturday, October 1, at 1 p.m. in the Campus Center at Le Moyne College.

Garang, a former rebel leader, had been sworn in as vice president of the Sudan just three weeks prior to the crash, following the January peace deal that ended a 21-year civil war between the mostly Muslim north and the Christian and animist south in which some 2 million people died. The event is part of the ongoing collaboration between Le Moyne and the Sudanese community of refugees. Members of the community will speak at the ceremony, including the Rev. Darius Makuja, himself a refugee and an instructor of religious studies at Le Moyne. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 445-4294.

"The Magdalene Sisters"

Le Moyne College will host a lecture on the film “The Magdalene Sisters” on Friday, September 16, at 7:30 p.m. in Grewen Auditorium. Speaking will be James M. Smith, assistant professor of English at Boston College.

The film, directed by Peter Mullan, charts several years in the young lives of four “fallen” women who were rejected by their families and abandoned to the mercy of the Catholic Church in 1960s Ireland. While women’s liberation was sweeping the globe, these women were stripped of their liberty and dignity and condemned to indefinite sentences of servitude in the Magdalene Laundries in order to atone for their “sins.” The last Magdalene Asylum in Ireland closed in 1996, and only since has the true horror of conditions in these institutions begun to emerge. Dr. Smith makes a compelling argument for the culpability of the Irish state in the maintenance of these Church-run laundries. Brief clips of the film will be shown during the lecture. Dr. James M. Smith specializes in Irish literature and culture, with a particular interest in twentieth-century Irish narrative, and is a leading authority on the Irish Magdalene Laundry scandals. His publications include “Two Irish National Tales: Maria Edgeworth’s ‘Castle Rackrent’ and Sydney Owenson’s ‘The Wild Irish Girl.’” He is currently working on a book titled “The Magdalene Laundry and Ireland’s Architecture of Containment.” He holds a bachelor’s degree from University College Dublin, Ireland; master’s degrees from Clark University and University College Dublin, Ireland; and a doctorate from Boston College. The lecture is free and open to the public. It is cosponsored by the English department, the Film Club, the Center for Peace and Global Studies, the O’Connell Chair, women’s studies, and the History Academy.

Le Moyne College to Host Opening Forum for 2nd Annual Syracuse International Film and Video Festival

Le Moyne College will host the opening forum for the 2nd Annual Syracuse International Film and Video Festival on Tuesday, April 26, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Grewen Auditorium. The topic for the forum will be African film.

Speakers on Le Moyne's panel will be award-winning filmmaker Ben Diogaye Beye from Senegal, and filmmakers Leosmiles Nnawuba and Ngozi Onwurah from Nigeria. The forum will be moderated by Gloria Gibson Hudson, dean of human and social science at Arkansas State, and one of the foremost scholars on African cinema and music. Meredith Terretta, from Le Moyne’s department of history, will be a respondent. The forum is free and open to the public. A webcast of the event can be accessed at http://xgen.vitalstream.com/mcasx.asx?media=1902273&package=1837153. The forum is sponsored by 10 different groups on campus, including the Center for Peace and Global Studies, the film program and film club, and the departments of English and history. For more information on the forum, contact Julie Grossman, chair of the English department, at (315) 445-4256. The festival will run from April 28 to May 1, with pre-festival events beginning April 25. For more information on the festival, visit http://www.syrfilmfest.com

"Analog to Digital: Our Transforming Upstate Economy"

The Madden Institute for Business Education at Le Moyne College will host a talk by Congressman James T. Walsh on Monday, April 25, at 6 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel. His talk is titled "Analog to Digital: Our Transforming Upstate Economy."

Walsh represents the 25th district of New York state in the U.S. House of Representatives as a member of the Committee on Appropriations. He is one of 10 chairmen of the Appropriations Subcommittees, a group sometimes referred to in Washington as “the College of Cardinals” because of their influence on national spending policies. In the 109th Congress, Walsh serves as chairman of the Subcommittee on Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs.

He also serves as chairman of the Friends of Ireland, a bipartisan working group of House members involved in Irish-American relations. He is the longest serving Friends chairman in House history, having been first appointed in 1995. He regularly leads Congressional Delegation trips to Ireland to work on the Northern peace initiative. Walsh also is responsible for the Walsh Visa, passed by Congress in 1998 and reauthorized in 2004, which allows citizens from Northern Ireland and the border countries to live and work in the U.S. for three years with a goal of learning an applicable trade and experiencing life in a multi-cultural society.

Walsh holds a bachelor’s degree from St. Bonaventure University and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Nepal.

"The War Against Violent Islamic Terrorism

The horrific events of 9/11 forever changed America and the world. The tremendous and still-evolving ramifications of that day will be discussed by Dr. John Lehman, a member of the 9/11 Commission, at a talk titled "The War Against Violent Islalmic Terrorism." This special event, sponsored by the Madden Institute for Business Education at Le Moyne College, will take place on Wednesday, April 14, at 7:00 P.M. in the Panasci Family Chapel. In late 2002, Lehman was appointed to the 9/11 Commission, an independent, bipartisan commission created by Congress and chartered to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. This commission is continuing its investigation and is expected to issue its highly anticipated report on July 26, 2004.

In addition to his role as one of only 10 members on the commission, Lehman also served for six years (1981 to 1987) as Secretary of the Navy under President Reagan, and prior to that, worked for Dr. Henry Kissinger on the National Security Council. Currently, in addition to his duties on the commission, he serves as chairman of the private equity investment firm J. F. Lehman & Company.

Lehman is the author of numerous books, including “On Seas of Glory,” “Command of the Seas,” and “Making War.” He holds a bachelor’s degree from St. Joseph’s University, bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Cambridge University, and a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently a Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University.

Irish Prime Minister to Receive Honorary Degree

Rep. Jim Walsh and Charles Beirne, S.J., president of Le Moyne College, today announced that Mr. Bertie Ahern, T.D., Prime Minister (Taoiseach) of Ireland, will travel to Syracuse and Central New York on Tuesday, March 15, at the Congressman's invitation. The highlight of the day will be the awarding of an honorary Doctor of Laws degree at Le Moyne College followed by a formal address delivered by the Prime Minister.

"Bertie Ahern is a man for whom I have great respect," said Congressman Walsh. "Not only has he led Ireland into becoming Europe's strongest economy, he's been deeply involved in the Peace Process, focusing on creating lasting peace with justice in Northern Ireland. I am delighted that he has chosen Syracuse as a stop on his upcoming U.S. tour."

"Le Moyne College feels honored to welcome Prime Minister Bertie Ahern, a true statesman who has taken great steps toward furthering the peace process in Ireland," said Le Moyne President Charles J. Beirne, S.J. "We are very grateful to Congressman Walsh for asking us to participate actively in this historic visit."

The honorary degree ceremony and formal address are scheduled for 2 p.m. at the Panasci Family Chapel on the Le Moyne College campus. The event is free and open to the public, though seating is limited.

Ahern's visit, his first to Syracuse, marks the first visit by a sitting head of government to the Le Moyne College campus. Upon leaving Syracuse, the Prime Minister will be traveling to New York City and Washington to partake in traditional St. Patrick's Day festivities in both of those cities.

Walsh is chairman of Congress’ bicameral Friends of Ireland Committee, co-chair of the U.S.-Irish Inter-parliamentary group, and author of the Walsh Visa bill, the only U.S. legislation associated with the Northern Ireland peace process. He has led several official Congressional delegations to Ireland and has worked with the Taoiseach on such issues as the Irish Peace Process since Mr. Ahern ascended to the position in June 1997. ;

2004

Hospice in Russia: Slideshow and Lecture
presented by Dr. Susan Behuniak
Monday, November 15 - 7:00 P.M.

In the Spring of 2004, Dr. Susan Behuniak, professor of political science and a volunteer family caregiver with Hospice of CNY, taught hospice principles and practices at the four-year-old Hospice in Velikiy Novgorod, Russia.

On Monday, November 15, at 7 p.m. in the Reilley Room, Behuniak will talk about her experiences. Drawing on photographs, Russian poetry, and demographics, Behuniak will offer a comparative analysis of Russian and American practices regarding death that explores how dying is shaped by cultural, religious, and political contexts.

International Street Fair and Study Abroad Fair

The International Street Fair and Study Abroad Fair will be held on Thursday, November 11, from 4:30 - 7:30 p.m. in the Campus Center. This event is a fun opportunity for students, faculty, administrators and staff to enjoy international music, dance, and food, while learning about the many different cultures represented at the College. Information about study abroad opportunities will be available throughout the evening.

"Election Results: What Do They Mean?"
presented by Dr. John Freie
Tuesday, November 9 - 7:30 P.M.

Le Moyne College’s political science department and Center for Peace and Global Studies, in conjunction with Peace Action CNY, will sponsor a public forum on “Election Results: What Do They Mean?” on Tuesday, November 9, at 7:30 p.m. at May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society, 3800 E. Genesee Street.

John Freie, professor of political science at Le Moyne, and Johan Eliasson, graduate assistant/instructor and doctoral candidate at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, will address the audience and then take questions and moderate discussion.

John Freie will begin with an analysis of the election results and what they may tell us about the political landscape of the country. Freie researches and teaches electoral politics, with an emphasis on the role of third parties. When large numbers of people who have not previously voted are brought into the election process, they can bring about a shift in national politics. Having voted once, they tend to do so again on a regular basis. The registration of many new voters in this election cycle has the potential to realign political realities and influence the political scene for 30 years. Freie will point out the things to look for as the election results are analyzed.

Johan Eliasson will address the possible implications of the election results on U.S. foreign policy, specifically toward Europe. Eliasson specializes in international relations and comparative politics. His current research focuses on the American Electoral College system and how it compares with other systems used throughout the world. Eliasson also studies European defense integration, NATO, and U.S.-European relations.

After these brief presentations, the floor will be open for questions and discussion.

Le Moyne College and Cazenovia College Co-host Symposium
on the Genocide Crisis in Sudan
Saturday, November 6 - 9:30 - 4:30 P.M.
Cazenovia College, Hubbard Hall - Seminary Street

On Saturday, November 6, Le Moyne College and Cazenovia College will co-host a one-day symposium on the crisis in Sudan. The symposium will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Cazenovia College, Hubbard Hall, on Seminary Street.

Student presentations on the Sudan and genocide will be followed by lunch with keynote speaker, the Rev. Darius O. Makuja, an instructor of religious studies at Le Moyne College, who is from the Sudan. The afternoon discussion will cover the role the Central New York community can play in ending genocide in Sudan. The symposium is co-sponsored by the Cazenovia College Human Rights Club and Le Moyne College’s Amnesty International Club and funded in part by the student government associations of both colleges and a number of local businesses.

The goal of the symposium is to educate participants and to discuss ways to help with the Sudan situation. Student speakers from both Cazenovia and Le Moyne will encourage participants to go back to their high schools, colleges and communities and become involved in helping the situation in Sudan.

Le Moyne College To Be Host Site For World Food Day Teleconference

Le Moyne College will join in a worldwide teleconference on hunger on World Food Day, Friday, October 15, from noon – 3 p.m. in Grewen Auditorium. The three-hour program, titled “Politics of Hunger: What’s at Stake?” will be broadcast live from Washington, D.C.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), more than 800 million people, or close to 15 % of the world’s population, “go to bed hungry every night ... the vast majority in Africa and Asia.” Decisions affecting the state of food insecurity in the world take place at all levels and in many places from civil society meetings to corporate board rooms to U.N. conferences. Politics, broadly defined, is “the art of allocating resources” or “who gets what, when and how.” In spite of summits and studies and surveys indicating a high degree of support for ending hunger, the world community has been unable to meet the goal of cutting hunger in half by 2015 much less of achieving a world free of hunger. This year’s program will examine the decision-making process involved in developing food policies.

Pollster John Zogby to Speak on "The Armageddon Election"

Since 1992 and the return of partisan politics, the country has been through tumultuous times. Voters this year seem desirous of change. But it is more than a change of policies they seek; it is a change of spirit. Whether Bush or Kerry can avoid another “Armageddon election” that contributes to the belief that victory by one or the other spells doom for the country remains to be seen. In order to govern, it will be necessary for the winner to reach across the partisan divide. Thus, the most intriguing question is not who will win. Rather, will the next president govern in the spirit of John Adams, whose presidency roiled the partisan waters, or Thomas Jefferson, who calmed them?

Pollster John Zogby examines these issues when he speaks at Le Moyne College on Thursday, September 23, at 8 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel. His talk is titled “The Armageddon Election.”

Zogby, president and CEO of Zogby International, holds degrees in history from Le Moyne College and Syracuse University. Since 1996, Zogby International has polled for Reuters News Agency and NBC News. His clients also include MSNBC, the New York Post, Gannett News Service, the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Pittsburgh Post Gazette, and nearly every daily newspaper in New York state, as well as television stations throughout the U.S.

Zogby recently released a special report on the 2004 presidential election with co-author John K. White, professor of politics at Catholic University, titled “The Armageddon Election: Bush vs. Kerry and the New Partisan Era.”

Le Moyne College to Host Lecture Recital by West African Griot

Le Moyne College will host a lecture recital by West African griot Alhaji Papa Susso on Wednesday, September 15, at 7 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel.

Resembling the bard in the Western world, griots have preserved orally the history of political and religious institutions, and of individual families throughout the region. Arab and Berber travelers who wrote about West African griots as early as the 12th century compared their performances to the narrative forms of Arab and Islamic poetry.

Papa Susso hails from a long line of griots of the Mandinka people. He will demonstrate the kora, a 21-stringed lute-harp, which evolved from earlier hunter harps played in 13th-century West Africa. The instrument is reputed to have been invented by the Susso family. Papa Susso was taught the kora by his father and has been playing since the age of five.

He received a bachelor’s degree in 1969 from Outington University in Suakoko, Liberia, and pursued a career in The Gambia civil service for several years before returning to his traditional role as a kora player to help preserve his African culture, becoming the chief kora player of the Gambia National Cultural Troupe. In 1974, he resigned from the group to form The Manding Music and Dance Limited, a company dedicated to conducting research and carrying out studies into the history, traditions and ethnomusicology of Manding. Papa Susso performed at the United Nations as well as at Carnegie Hall twice, and has appeared with the Baltimore, Detroit, San Antonio, St. Louis and Chicago Symphonies. He was appointed Regents’ Lecturer in ethnomusicology in 1991 at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The lecture recital is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies, the History Academy, and the Learning Communities at Le Moyne. For more information, call 445-4294.

Activist Lee-Alison Sibley to Speak on Peace Initiatives April 19

Le Moyne College’s Center for Peace and Global Studies will present a lecture titled "Peace Initiatives Through Different Prisms" by Lee-Alison Sibley on Monday, April 19, at 7 p.m. in the Curtin Special Events Room (located in the Campus Center). Sibley, an actress, singer, educator and author, will speak on her work as an activist from the perspectives of daughter, wife, mother and teacher. She has lived and performed around the world. She has been a guest lecturer at Jadavpur University, Calcutta University and Dhaka University in South Asia; served as head of performing arts at the Amman Baccalaureate School in Jordan and performed in productions throughout the U.S. and abroad. Sibley holds master’s degrees in education and music and speaks 11 languages. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Peace & Global Studies sponsors lecture on Bush's foreign policies

Le Moyne College’s Center for Peace and Global Studies and Peace Action of CNY will host peace correspondent Jonathan Schell in a lecture titled "The Empire Backfires," on Tuesday, April 6 at 7:30 p.m. at May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society (3800 E. Genesee St.).

Schell, a peace and disarmament correspondent for The Nation and Harold Willens Peace Fellow at the Nation Institute, will speak on the Bush administration’s foreign policies. He will present arguments on why these policies are wrong and how they are failing. Schell is author of "The Fate of the Earth," which served as a cornerstone of the nuclear abolition movement. His most recent book, "The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence and the Will of the People," sets forth a path to a world where armed conflict is no longer the arbiter of political disputes. Schell is also a contributor to Harper’s, The Atlantic, The New Yorker and Foreign Affairs.

Fourth Annual Berrigan Lecture

International House is proud to announce that the fourth annual Rev. Daniel Berrigan SJ/International House Peacemaker Lecturee will take place on Monday, April 5, at 6 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel. This year’s lecture will be delivered by Amy Goodman, host and executive producer of Pacifica Radio’s award winning radio show “Democracy Now!” Goodman’s talk is titled “Independent Media in Time of War and Election.”

Amy Goodman began her career in community radio in 1985 at Pacifica Radio’s New York Station, WBAI. She produced WBAI’s Evening News for 10 years. In 1990 and 1991, Amy traveled to East Timor to report on the U.S.-backed Indonesian occupation of East Timor. There, she and colleague Allan Nairn witnessed Indonesian soldiers gun down 270 East Timorese. Indonesian soldiers beat Goodman and Nairn, fracturing Nairn’s skull. Their documentary, "Massacre: The Story of East Timor," won numerous awards, including the Robert F. Kennedy Prize for International Reporting, the Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia Silver Baton, the Armstrong Award, the Radio/Television News Directors Award, as well as awards from the Associated Press, United Press International, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. In 1996, Goodman helped launch Pacifica Radio’s “Democracy Now!” Two years later, Goodman and producer Jeremy Scahill went to Nigeria. Their radio documentary "Drilling and Killing: Chevron and Nigeria's Oil Dictatorship" exposed Chevron’s role in the killing of two Nigerian villagers in the Niger Delta, who were protesting yet another oil spill in their community. That documentary won the George Polk Award, the Golden Reel for Best National Documentary from the National Federation of Community Broadcasters, and a Project Censored award. In 1999, Amy Goodman traveled to Peru to interview American political prisoner Lori Berenson. It was the first time a journalist had ever been able to get into the prison to interview her.

Mexican Fiesta at Le Moyne College

Le Moyne College is planning a Mexican Fiesta on Thursday March 25th from 6:00pm-8:30pm in the Campus Center to raise funds for the Mexican Child Sponsorship Program. Kristin McDermott, a Political Science major, spearheaded this event. It is sponsored by Student Development, LSPB and The Center for Peace and Global Studies. This is a student event and the cost is $5.00 and one meal ticket. Raffle prizes will be awarded.

Human Rights Activist; Architect and Urban Planner Visits Le Moyne

From February 16-20 Le Moyne College and the Peace and Global Studies Center will host a Woodrow Wilson Fellow in Residence, Dimon Liu. Ms. Liu is a well-known Chinese human rights activist, architect and urban planner. In addition to a public lecture on Thurs., February 19th at 7:00pm in the Curtin Special Events Room, Ms. Liu will be available for talks to classes and groups during her week in residence. Notable activism since 1972 include urging human rights organizations to embrace the Chinese in their concerns, systematically briefing journalists on conditions in China, giving teach-ins to Chinese on how to get involved, and setting up human rights organizations within Chinese pro-democracy groups. Her writings on human rights, rule of law, democracy, and military strategy have appeared in many journals and newspapers including Asian Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, Newsday, The Washington Times, etc. She has given talks on China at the Council on Foreign Affairs, American Enterprise Institute, the Heritage Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Center, etc.

2003

International Street Fair & Study Abroad Fair

The International Street Fair and Study Abroad Fair will take place Wednesday, Nov. 12th from 4-7 p.m. on the first floor of Le Moyne's Campus Center. Please join the campus community in celebrating our students' diverse backgrounds. Those attending will have the opportunity to visit various table displays hosted by members of the international student club and study abroad representatives. A wide range of lively entertainment will begin at 5 p.m. In addition, a sampling of international foods will be served in the dining hall for dinner, while desserts will be available in the Den. This is a mandatory event for first-year students. Please contact Allison Cuda at 445-4275 with any questions.

Le Moyne Hosts Talk on Violence in the Holy Land

Donald Moore S.J., director of interfaith relations at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Jerusalem, will speak at Le Moyne College on Tuesday, November 11, at 7:30 p.m. in the Reilley Room, located in Reilly Hall. He will offer first-hand reflections on the Israeli/Palestinian conflict.

Former rector of the Jesuit community at Fordham University and superior of the West Side Jesuit community, Moore began a two-year leave of absence from Fordham in January 2000 to serve as director of interfaith relations at Pontifical Biblical Institute in Jerusalem. He now spends fall semesters at Fordham and the rest of the year at the Pontifical Biblical Institute. There, he is involved in working for peace, justice and reconciliation and serves as pastor for an English-speaking community in the area. Moore is author of “The Human and the Holy: The Spirituality of Abraham Joshua Heschel” and “Martin Buber: Prophet of Religious Secularism.”

The talk is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by International House and the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne.

Keith Watenpaugh to Speak on Iraq

Dr. Keith Watenpaugh, assistant professor of history and associate director of the Center for Peace & Global Studies at Le Moyne, will speak on Tuesday, October 28, at 7:30 p.m. in the Curtin Special Events Room. His talk is titled "The American Occupation and the Challenges of a Democratic Iraq." The talk is free and open to the public.

Debate on "America's Role in the World"

On October 16, at 7:30p.m. a debate will be held on "America's Role in the World" in the Grewen Auditorium

Le Moyne College to Host New York Times Reporter and Author Chris Hedges

New York Times reporter Chris Hedges will speak at Le Moyne College on “War Is A Force That Gives Us Meaning” on Thursday, October 9, at 7 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel.

Hedges has spent 15 years covering crises in many conflict-ridden locations including El Salvador, Nicaragua, Iraq, Sarajevo and Kosovo. His book, by the same title, is a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. In it, Hedges addresses humanity’s love affair with war, offering a moving and thought-provoking perspective on the topic, drawing on classic as well as contemporary literature of combat.

Hedges served as Middle East Bureau Chief (based in Jerusalem) for the Dallas Morning News from 1988-90 and for the New York Times (based in Cairo) from 1991-95. He was a member of the New York Times team that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for coverage of global terrorism. Hedges received the 2002 Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism. He has appeared on a variety of programs including The News Hour, CBS Sunday Morning, NPR’s Talk of the Nation and CNN.

Hedges holds a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Colgate University and a master’s degree in divinity from Harvard University. He currently teaches at Princeton University.

The lecture is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne. For more information, call (315) 445-4294.

Making Sense of the War? Le Moyne to Host Second Teach-in on War in Iraq

The deans of management and arts & sciences, the student senate, the faculty senate and the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne College are collaborating to organize a series of "Teach-in" discussions of the war in Iraq titled "Making Sense of the War?"

According to its mission statement, Le Moyne College "seeks to prepare its members for leadership and service in their personal and professional lives to promote a more just society." Consistent with this mission, the teach-in will offer a series of brief presentations on different aspects of the war, both as it unfolds in Iraq and at home. These presentations will stress skills, ideas, and information that will help everyone in the community to make informed decisions and judgments on this vital issue. The presenters will be sensitive to the fact that as a "diverse learning community," no one view of the war predominates.

The second session in the series will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 15, in the Community Room of the Chapel, when Wayne A. Grove, assistant professor of economics, will discuss "The Economic Implications of the War with Iraq.”

In the second half of the program, Susan Behuniak, professor of political science and chair of the political science department will explore the important issues of "Clashing Democratic Values: Political Speech in Time of War, and Privacy in a Time of Terrorism."

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Barron Boyd, director of the Center for Peace and Global Studies, at 445-4293.

Le Moyne to Host Teach-in on War in Iraq

The deans of management and arts & sciences, the student senate, the faculty senate and the Center for Peace and Global Studies at Le Moyne College are collaborating to organize a series of "Teach-in" discussions of the war in Iraq titled "Making Sense of the War?"

According to its mission statement, Le Moyne College "seeks to prepare its members for leadership and service in their personal and professional lives to promote a more just society." Consistent with this mission, the teach-in will offer a series of brief presentations on different aspects of the war, both as it unfolds in Iraq and at home. These presentations will stress skills, ideas, and information that will help everyone in the community to make informed decisions and judgments on this vital issue. The presenters will be sensitive to the fact that as a "diverse learning community," no one view of the war predominates.

The first session will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 3, in the Reilley Room, located in Reilly Hall, when Christina Michaelson, a clinical psychologist and assistant professor of psychology, will explore some of the diverse psychological aspects of the war and our response to it. She will also emphasize strategies for coping with the stressful effects of war.

In the second half of the program, Brian Paul Campbell, S.J., director of the Le Moyne communications program, will help us sort through the often bewildering set of media images of the war that we see on TV and in the newspapers. He will also discuss how our media differs in its presentation of the situation from the media in the rest of the world.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Barron Boyd, director of the Center for Peace and Global Studies, at 445-4293.

Mexican Fiesta at Le Moyne College

Le Moyne College is planning a Mexican Fiesta on Thursday March 27th from 7:pm-8:30pm in the Campus Center to raise funds for the Mexican Child Sponsorship Program. Kristin McDermott, a Political Science major, spearheaded this event. It is sponsored by Student Development, LSPB and The Center for Peace and Global Studies.

This is a student event and the cost is $5.00 and one meal ticket. Raffle prizes will be awarded.

Le Moyne College Plans Multiple Events for Women's History Month

Le Moyne College will celebrate Women's History Month with a variety of activities to be held on campus. All events are free and open to the public.

Silent Witness: An Exhibit to Stop Domestic Violence
In tribute to Lee-Anne Scaccia-Cruz
March 10 - 15, 8:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Lobby of the W. Carroll Coyne Center for the Performing Arts

As a community, we are all silent witnesses to the issue of domestic violence. The Silent Witness exhibit is a joint initiative of the Junior League of Syracuse and Vera House. It is part of a larger effort consisting of more than 300 exhibits nationwide. The Silent Witness figures represent local victims whose lives were taken by domestic violence. The objectives of this exhibit are to provide information on the issue of domestic violence and its effects on our community and to encourage action to create change.

Domestic Violence in Our Community
Loren Cunningham
Co-Coordinator of the Syracuse Area Domestic Violence Coalition
Monday, March 10, 7 p.m.
Curtin Special Events Room, Campus Center

The program will include a general overview of domestic violence dynamics, in relation to the Silent Witness exhibit (in the PAC Lobby all week). Cunningham will discuss a coordinated community response to domestic violence and what we as community members can do to bring safety and respect to all in Onondaga County. The presentation will include a screening of the award winning video, "Faces of Domestic Violence," produced by Vera House.

The Deep Historical Origins of Catholic/Protestant Violence in Ireland
Dr. Barbara Blaszak, professor of history, Le Moyne College
Wednesday, March 12, 7 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

In preparation for the upcoming Berrigan Lecture by Nobel Prize Laureate Mairead Corrigan Maguire, Le Moyne's own Dr. Barbara Blaszak will discuss the beginnings of the Irish conflict. She will give an informal talk that will concentrate on the period from 1880-1914 and that will pave the way for Mairead Corrigan Maguire's discussion of present-day efforts to resist violence in Northern Ireland.


A Personal Story of Overcoming Family Violence
Rae
In tribute to Alicia Kromer-Humphreys
Thursday, March 13, 7 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

The struggles of family violence are much more than physical. Rae will discuss both her own experience and that of her friend, Alicia Kromer-Humphreys, one of the women featured in the Silent Witness exhibit. She will show how complex each individual case can be, resulting in vastly different outcomes.


Building a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence
The Rev. Daniel Berrigan/International House Peacemaker Lecture
Mairead Corrigan Maguire
Nobel Peace Prize Laureate
Wednesday, March 19, 7:30 p.m.
Panasci Family Chapel

Mairead Corrigan Maguire was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1976 for her peacemaking initiatives. Maguire has continued to work ceaselessly for peace and justice in Northern Ireland and around the world. Her talk will be about her own experiences in Northern Ireland and her visits to places in the Middle East, including Iraq.

Why doesn't she just leave?
Joshua M. Price, assistant professor of human development
Binghamton University
Thursday, March 20, 7 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

The question, "Why doesn't she just leave?" seems to be asked of all battered women. This question assumes that all battered women are battered in the home, can leave that home, and have somewhere to go. In his talk, Dr. Price will show how the inadequacy and inappropriateness of this question becomes obvious if we examine different women's accounts of space. With an eye to dismantling the fiction that women's experiences of violence are homogenous, he will discuss how attention to space allows us to uncover the multiplicity of violence that different women face.

Naming the Violence Against Women: Gender, Power and Oppression
The Students of PSY 275 (Psychology of Women)
Tuesday, March 25, 3:30 - 5:30 pm
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

Dr. Maria DiTullio's Psychology of Women classes at Le Moyne College invite you to attend their poster session entitled "Naming the Violence Against Women: Gender, Power, and Oppression." Browse through the research posters highlighting the literature that explores the many forms of violence against women.

Rethinking Violence Against Women of Color
Maria C. Lugones, associate professor of comparative literature
Binghamton University
Wednesday, March 26, 7 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

Dr. Lugones will consider how violence against women of color works in the midst of racism, capitalism and colonialism. This analysis provides a new perspective on what "gender" and "gender violence" are.

Living in Coalition against Violence
INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence
Thursday, March 27, 7 p.m.
Grewen Auditorium

How are you affected and how do you affect the intersection of state and interpersonal violence against women of color? INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence is a national, activist organization of radical feminists of color that is mobilizing to end all forms of violence against women of color and communities of color. By supporting grassroots organizing, they hope to advance a national movement to nurture the health and well-being of communities of color, as well as global peace, justice and liberation. This workshop is open to persons of all races and genders.

The Accused
Film and Discussion
Tabor Fisher, facilitator, visiting assistant professor of philosophy
Le Moyne College
Monday, March 31, 7 p.m.
Reilley Room, Reilly Hall

Jonathan Kaplan's "The Accused," which is based upon an actual story, takes a frank look at the intersections between gender, violence and the law. Jodie Foster plays Sarah Tobias, a tough, attractive, young woman who is raped in a local bar and who struggles with prosecutor Kathryn Murphy (played by Kelly McGillis) to see that justice is done. After the film, Dr. Tabor Fisher of the philosophy department will facilitate a discussion.
Please take into consideration that the movie is about a violent rape. It may be extremely disturbing to some viewers, especially those who have experienced sexual violence themselves.

For more information about any event, contact 445-4159 or 445-4773.

Women's History Month events are co-sponsored by the Diversity Committee, Campus Ministry, the Lecture Committee, the Peace and Global Studies Program, and International House at Le Moyne, and by Amnesty International.

Center for Peace and Global Studies Lecture

Professor Patricia Lorcin, department of history, Texas Tech University, will present her paper, "Africa Made Me:
Gender, Imperialism and Nostalgia in the Genesis of Literary Personality," on Thursday, February 27, at 5 p.m. in the faculty lounge.

The central argument of this paper is that colonial Africa was an essential factor in the literary development of Isabelle Eberhardt (1877-1904) and Isak Dinesen, (1885-1962). Although they remained firmly anchored to the context of their times in that they endorsed the imperial endeavor, in creating their literary identities they manipulated the images of gender and imperialism in such a manner as to transcend ordinary colonial mentalities and provide an appeal which extended beyond the boundaries of colonial literature to a post-colonial audience. The formulation of this process became a template for nostalgia, the legacy of which still resonates today.

Patricia M. E. Lorcin specializes in nineteenth and twentieth century France with a particular interest in French imperialism, colonialism and post-colonial studies. The focus of her published work is colonial Algeria. Her publications include Imperial Identities (1995/99), and various articles on French cultural Imperialism in edited volumes and scholarly journals. She is at present working on two projects: a monograph, which will examine the construction of gender and imperialism in the works of women novelists, and an edited volume on identity, memory and nostalgia in colonial Algeria. She is also coordinating efforts to establish an overseas program and center for Texas Tech students in
Brussels.

Peace and Global Studies Faculty Seminar 2002-2003: Feminist Approaches to Peace, War and Global Studies

To promote faculty dialogue and development, the Center for Peace and Global Studies is pleased to announce the formation of the first annual faculty seminar. For this seminar, the center has chosen the theme of feminist perspectives on peace, war and global studies and has asked Lynne Arnault, associate professor of philosophy and director of women’s studies, to serve as the facilitator.

The purpose of the seminar will be to bring together a diverse group of faculty who are interested in reading and discussing some of the work that feminists in different disciplines and from various schools of thought have produced on issues in peace and global studies.

The Center for Peace and Global Studies will be covering the costs of reading materials, refreshments, and a $300 stipend for each participant. The seminar will meet five or six times during the remainder of the academic year, beginning in November, and participants will have an opportunity to contribute to the seminar’s specific agenda.

The seminar will ask a series of questions including:

What do women have to do with war?
In what ways are gender and war mutually reinforcing phenomena?
What is the complex relationship between wartime violence and everyday violence?
When violence, loss, and deprivation are everyday conditions of life, how are maternal practices affected?
When the homefront is the battlefield, what should we say is the opposite of war?
How does gender intersect with communal, sectarian and genocidal violence?
How does the legal and social tolerance of violence against women contribute to broader views and policy on peace and war?
How can feminists draw attention to the uses of rape in warfare "without allowing women who have endured rape to be turned into symbols of ‘national humiliation’ or allowing news of rapes to inflame masculinized revenge?"
What are the liabilities as well as merits of a human rights approach to the relationship between gender and war?

The Center plans to invite Nancy Scheper-Hughes, author of "Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil," to meet with the seminar during Spring Semester.